Reports

Below are links to some of Tri-State's major reports and publications. Most documents are in Adobe's PDF format (Get Adobe Acrobat Reader here).

2016

The Region's Most Dangerous Roads for Walking (2016) - This analysis identifies the most dangerous roads (those with the most pedestrian fatalities from 2012 to 2014) in the tri-state region, and the locations and number of pedestrian fatalities for selected counties and boroughs in Connecticut, New Jersey and New York. Includes factsheets and maps.

Third Annual LIRR Laggy Analysis - The Laggy Analysis ranks those branches of the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) with the greatest lost economic productivity, delay per rider and lost time.

Stuck At The Station - Fifteen years of declining investment has harmed New Jersey's ability to deliver high-quality transit service.

2015

What Lies Ahead: An Overview of NJDOT's 2016 Capital Program - An analysis of the New Jersey Department of Transportation’s (NJDOT) and New Jersey Transit’s (NJT) Transportation Capital Program for fiscal year 2016. Overview | Roads and Bridges | Bicycles and Pedestrians

New Jersey Transit Fare History & Gas Tax Comparison - This series of facsheets demonstrates how New Jersey Transit fares have outpaced inflation, while the real economic value of New Jersey's gas tax has fallen.

The Region's Most Dangerous Roads for Walking (2015) - This analysis identifies the most dangerous roads (those with the most pedestrian fatalities from 2011 to 2013) in the tri-state region, and the locations and number of pedestrian fatalities for selected counties and boroughs in Connecticut, New Jersey and downstate New York. Includes factsheets and interactive maps.

2014

Second Annual LIRR Laggy Analysis - The Laggy Analysis ranks those branches of the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) with the greatest lost economic productivity, delay per rider and lost time.

What Lies Ahead: An Overview of NJDOT's 2015 Capital Program (2014) - An analysis of the New Jersey Department of Transportation’s (NJDOT) and New Jersey Transit’s (NJT) Transportation Capital Program for fiscal year 2015.

Older Pedestrians at Risk (2014) - Tri-State's 2014 analysis shows that older pedestrians are more likely to be killed while walking than their younger neighbors. The report includes county-specific fact sheets, along with suggestions for making tri-state area roads safer for all users.

Fairfield County Pedestrian Crashes - A groundbreaking analysis finds that in the three years from 2010 to 2012, over 1,100 people were injured or killed while walking in Fairfield County.

The Region's Most Dangerous Roads for Walking (2014) - This analysis identifies the most dangerous roads (those with the most pedestrian fatalities from 2010 to 2012) in the tri-state region, and the locations and number of pedestrian fatalities for selected counties and boroughs in Connecticut, New Jersey and downstate New York. Includes factsheets and online maps.

2013

Supporting Economic Growth and Opportunity: The Economic Impact of Suburban Bus Service in Westchester and Nassau Counties - An analysis of the impact of local and regional bus service on the economies of two downstate New York suburban counties.

Looking Ahead and Looking Back: An Examination of the NJDOT & NJT 2014 Capital Program (2013) - An analysis of the New Jersey Department of Transportation’s (NJDOT) and New Jersey Transit’s (NJT) Transportation Capital Program for fiscal year 2014.

Pedestrian and Bicyclist Crashes in Albany and Westchester Counties - Analysis of vehicle crashes with pedestrians or bicyclists in Albany and Westchester Counties between January 1, 2009 and May 31, 2012 (with maps).

First Annual LIRR Laggy Analysis - The Laggy Analysis ranks those branches of the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) with the greatest lost economic productivity, delay per rider and lost time.

New Jersey Complete Streets Liability Primer (2013) - An overview of liability issues related to roadway planning and design in New Jersey. Includes benefits of Complete Streets designs and information about Complete Streets planning resources.

Tracking the Dollars: A Review of Transportation Spending in Connecticut (2013) - A review of Connecticut's 2012-2015 statewide transportation improvement program (STIP) and what it says about Connecticut's transportation priorities. Methodology available here.

Transit-Oriented Development Toolkit for Connecticut (2013) - A collaborative project by Connecticut Fund for the Environment, Partnership for Strong Communities, Regional Plan Association and Tri-State Transportation Campaign.

The Region's Most Dangerous Roads for Walking (2013) - This analysis identifies the most dangerous roads (those with the most pedestrian fatalities from 2009 to 2011) in the tri-state region, and the locations and number of pedestrian fatalities for selected counties and boroughs in Connecticut, New Jersey and downstate New York. Includes factsheets and online maps.

Pedestrian Fatalities in Southern New Jersey (2013) - This report offers policy recommendations on how public agencies in New Jersey can improve tracking of pedestrian fatalities based upon demographic factors in order to target safety improvements to dangerous roadways in areas where residents are more likely to walk.

Older Pedestrians at Risk (2013) - Tri-State's 2013 analysis shows that older pedestrians are more likely to be killed while walking than their younger neighbors. The report includes county-specific fact sheets, along with suggestions for making tri-state area roads safer for all users.

2012

Northern NJ's Most Dangerous Roads for Biking (2012) - From 2001 to 2011 there were 19,551 bicycle crashes in 13 Northern New Jersey counties (Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Passaic, Somerset, Sussex, Union and Warren). Of these, 81 were fatal. All accidents are bicyclist-vehicle.

BK Gateway Transportation Vision - Planning for now and the next generation of Downtown Brooklyn. A report from Tri-State Transportation Campaign, Prospect Heights Neighborhood Development Council, Park Slope Civic Council, Boerum Hill Association and the Office of New York City Council member Letitia James.

Older Pedestrians at Risk - Tri-State's 2012 analysis shows that older pedestrians are more likely to be killed while walking than their younger neighbors. The report includes county-specific fact sheets, along with suggestions for making tri-state area roads safer for all users.

Tracking State Transportation Dollars - This report breaks down each state's transportation improvement program (known as a STIP), a federally mandated reporting document that lists all projects expected to be funded with federal dollars. The report also features an interactive website.

What's Ahead: An Examination of NJDOT's 2013 Proposed Capital Program - This analysis of NJDOT's proposed capital program finds that a trend towards funding new road capacity continues in New Jersey. The report calls attention to funding uncertainties looming over the agency and calls on the state to find more sustainable revenue sources for transportation.

Stuck at Home: How Cuts to Public Transit Disproportionately Hurt Seniors and Low-Income New Yorkers - Shrinking dollars for transit means shrinking options for those who can least afford it, including low-income, senior, and other transit-dependent populations. This report analyzes transit ridership, how transit systems are being affected by the recession, and how shrinking transit service affects New Yorkers' ability to stay mobile.

The Region's Most Dangerous Roads for Walking - This analysis identifies the most dangerous roads (those with the most pedestrian fatalities from 2008 to 2010) in the tri-state region, and the locations and number of pedestrian fatalities for selected counties and boroughs in New Jersey, downstate New York, and Connecticut. Includes factsheets and online maps.

Complete Streets in a Box Toolkit: Connecticut - TSTC and the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities teamed up to develop this toolkit to support the adoption and implementation of complete streets policies by Connecticut municipalities.

2011

Protecting Riders, Workers and Taxpayers in Nassau County: The Need for Answers in the Nassau County Bus Contract - This analysis of the proposed privatization of Nassau County's bus service raises important questions about the potential for service cuts and fare hikes. The authors also express concern about the lack of public representation on the Transit Advisory Committee.

Southern NJ's Most Dangerous Roads for Biking (2011) - From 2001 to 2010 there were 7,830 bicycle crashes in eight Southern New Jersey counties; 60 were fatal. Tri-State's analysis indicates that these crashes were concentrated around specific roads. In particular, arterials - high speed roads that typically have two or more lanes going in both directions - were the most dangerous of all. The report includes county-by-county rankings, fact sheets and maps.

Why Privatizing Long Island Bus Could Cost Taxpayers More - Nassau County plans to privatize the Long Island Bus system by the end of 2011, supposedly to save money. But an examination of other transit systems run by the private companies that have bid to run LI Bus finds that they receive disproportionately more funding than what the county is proposing to contribute to the system. They also provide disproportionately fewer hours of service than what the MTA currently provides.

Older Pedestrians at Risk (2011) - Older pedestrians are far more likely to be killed while walking than their younger neighbors -- and this is especially true in New Jersey, downstate New York, and Connecticut, where fatality rates for older pedestrians are far higher than in the rest of the country. Includes county-specific factsheets.

A Bumpy Road Ahead? A Close Look at NJDOT's 2012 Capital Program - This analysis of New Jersey DOT's 2012 capital program finds that road and bridge maintenance continue to make up the largest percentage of NJDOT’s capital program budget, but spending on road and bridge capacity expansion projects makes up the largest part of the program in nearly a decade, threatening to undermine the state’s "fix-it-first" goals. Funding for signature smart growth programs has been reduced or eliminated, while funding for bicycle and pedestrian projects has increased

The Region's Most Dangerous Roads for Walking - This analysis identifies the most dangerous roads (those with the most pedestrian fatalities from 2007 to 2009) in the tri-state region, and the locations and number of pedestrian fatalities for selected counties and boroughs in New Jersey, downstate New York, and Connecticut. Includes factsheets and online maps.

 

2010

More Than a Bandage for New Jersey's Crumbling Bridges - Over the past 10 years, New Jersey has made some progress in repairing deficient bridges. But the looming insolvency of the state's Transportation Trust Fund could derail that progress. Without a sustainable source of long-term funding, New Jersey may have to defer critical bridge replacement, rehabilitation, and repair projects, and its backlog of deficient bridges will likely grow.

Older Pedestrians at Risk - Older pedestrians are far more likely to be killed while walking than their younger neighbors -- and this is especially true in New Jersey, downstate New York, and Connecticut, where fatality rates for older pedestrians are far higher than in the rest of the country. Includes county-specific factsheets.

State Transportation Reform: How Advocates Are Winning - Even if major reforms are won in new federal transportation legislation, spending decisions will largely remain the purview of state officials. This report draws on interviews with over 20 transportation advocates to identify common challenges and key solutions to advancing transportation policy change at the state level.

Analysis of CT Transportation Spending Shows More Balanced Priorities - A new analysis of Connecticut's 2010 to 2013 transportation spending plan reveals that the Connecticut Department of Transportation is spending more on road and bridge repair, public transportation, and cycling and walking projects.

Monmouth University Poll on NJ Transportation Trust Fund - Over 70% of NJ residents are concerned about the impending bankruptcy of the state's Transportation Trust Fund, which pays for New Jersey's road, bridge, and transit projects, according to a Monmouth University poll commissioned by TSTC and NJ Future. Residents are evenly split on whether the state should increase transportation fees like the gas tax and tolls in order to address the crisis.

The Region's Most Dangerous Roads for Walking - This analysis identifies the most dangerous roads (those with the most pedestrian fatalities from 2006 to 2008) in the tri-state region, and the locations and number of pedestrian fatalities for selected counties and boroughs in New Jersey, downstate New York, and Connecticut. Includes factsheets and online maps.

 

2009

The State of Transportation: Benchmarks for Sustainable Transportation in New Jersey - New Jerseyans are driving less and taking transit more, according to this update of a 2006 TSTC report. The report covers 25 different measures of transportation in the state, including infrastructure, service, travel choices, congestion, and crowding.

Express Route to Better Bus Service - This report recommends both short and long term measures to improve bus service across the Hudson, including a New Jersey-bound exclusive bus lane through the Lincoln Tunnel during evening rush hours, better online information on bus routes, and expediting a study which began in 2005 to increase road space for buses traveling to the Lincoln Tunnel during morning rush hours. The report also calls for the New York City Department of Transportation to develop a coordinated approach to managing the growth in interstate buses on city streets.

Smart Mobility Analysis of NJ Turnpike Widening FEIS - This independent analysis shows that congestion relief on the New Jersey Turnpike can be achieved by less expensive and environmentally threatening methods than the planned expansion project. It highlights multiple errors in the NJ Turnpike Authority's environmental review documents that overstate the need for the widening project. The report was prepared by Smart Mobility, Inc. and commissioned by TSTC.

Spending the Stimulus: How Connecticut Can Put Thousands Back to Work by Jump-starting a 21st-Century Transportation System - This summary, co-released with Smart Growth America and ConnPIRG, provides a 10-item menu for how Connecticut can use stimulus dollars to make the transportation investments that address the state's pressing needs.

 

2008

Older Pedestrians at Risk - Older pedestrians are far more likely to be killed while walking than their younger neighbors, according to a new study by the Tri-State Transportation Campaign. This is especially true in the tri-state region, where fatality rates for older pedestrians are far higher than in the rest of the country.

Complete Streets: A National Perspective - This presentation, given at the 1000 Friends of Connecticut conference on Nov. 13, 2008, provides an overview of complete streets policies throughout the United States and describes what makes a complete streets policy strong.

Most Dangerous Roads - This analysis identifies the most dangerous roads (those with the most pedestrian fatalities from 2005 to 2007) in the tri-state region, and the locations and number of pedestrian fatalities for selected counties and boroughs in New Jersey, downstate New York, and Connecticut.

Skimping on Sidewalks 2008: An Analysis of Pedestrian and Bicyclist Fatalities in New Jersey - Though pedestrian and cyclist deaths fell between 2007 and 2006, this report finds that NJ has made little progress towards a 1998 goal of halving ped/bike deaths by 2010 -- and seniors are most at risk of dying as a pedestrian. The report also shows that municipal demand for bike/ped funding far exceeds the state's ability to support those types of projects, with applications outstripping awards by almost 10-to-1. Includes fact sheets which break the data down by county.

Trouble Ahead? Tracking NJDOT's Priorities- This analysis of NJDOT’s fiscal year 2009 capital program shows a continued commitment to maintenance and repair, but finds a worrying trend of increased investment in highway expansion in coming years. Furthermore, progress on NJDOT's smart growth projects has stalled. The report recommends that New Jersey resurrect legislation mandating a "fix-it-first" investment strategy for NJDOT, create a consistent "fix-it-first" policy for all state transportation agencies, re-examine the need for highway widening projects, and boost funding for the smart-growth NJFIT program and bike and pedestrian programs.

 

2007

NYC Metropolitan Area Fact Sheets on Congestion Pricing - This examination of 2000 Census data showed that the vast majority of commuters in New York City and the surrounding suburban counties would not be affected by a congestion pricing fee because they do not drive alone to the proposed congestion pricing zone (Manhattan below 60th Street). The analysis also showed that vehicle-owning households throughout the region are wealthier than households without access to a vehicle.

Getting Up to Speed: A Case for Bus Rapid Transit and Transit-Oriented Development in the Tappan Zee/I-287 Corridor - This evaluation of the Tappan Zee Bridge/I-287 Environmental Review calls for increased leadership from NYSDOT in connecting land use and transportation, and suggests that bus rapid transit, combined with a transit-oriented development strategy, would best reduce congestion in the I-287 corridor. The report also includes national and international examples of successful bus rapid transit systems and transit-oriented development efforts.

It's the Sprawl Stupid! What's Driving Connecticut's Traffic Congestion - This fact sheet explains the cycle of sprawl and congestion which has led to vast increases in Connecticut’s per capita traffic delay and vehicle-miles traveled over the last two decades. It recommends that CT embrace smart growth policies and create a transit village program that would provide state funding and incentives to interested towns.

Reform: The Road Not Taken - A Review of Projected Spending in Connecticut, 2007-2010 - This analysis of Connecticut’s 2007 to 2010 transportation plan reveals that the state will make highway expansion a priority in coming years. More than 60 percent of the $2.3 billion in projected highway and bridge spending is dedicated to widening and expansion projects. However, the state devotes a relatively high share of spending to transit projects. The report recommends that Connecticut adopt a "fix it first" approach to road infrastructure, develop more effective tools to manage congestion, and strengthen bicycling and walking programs.

 

2006

The State of Transportation 2006: Benchmarks for Sustainable Transportation in New Jersey - This report identifies dozens of metrics which help answer questions about the direction of New Jersey's transportation systems, collecting them in a user-friendly and graphic-rich document. Important findings include rises in vehicle miles traveled, miles traveled on transit, freight movement, transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions, and energy consumption for transportation.

 

2005

Skimping on Sidewalks: New Jersey's Bicycle and Pedestrian Funding Deficit - Though municipal demand for bicycling and pedestrian projects has soared since NJ issued its Statewide Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan in 1995, the state is not even coming close to meeting this demand. This analysis of Bikeways, Safe Streets to School, and Transportation Enhancements funding applications and approvals for fiscal years 2003 to 2005 reveals that the state approved less than one-fourth of all submitted applications.

Still at Risk: Pedestrian Safety in New Jersey - New Jersey made pedestrian and bicyclist safety a transportation priority beginning in 1995 with the publication of the Statewide Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan. But a ten-year look at the trend in pedestrian fatalities reveals no perceptible reduction in pedestrian deaths, even as Census data shows fewer New Jersey residents walking.

The Trucks Are Coming: What Growing Truck Traffic Will Mean for New Jersey's Quality of Life - New Jersey's truck traffic is projected to grow by 80% over the next two decades, with enormous consequences for traffic safety, congestion, wear and tear on roads and bridges, air pollution, and public health. Recommendations include increased funding for rail freight, better planning of freight distribution, innovations like "shuttle trains."

 

2004

The Open Road: The Region's Coming Toll Revolution - Around the region, transportation agencies are upgrading toll plazas to take advantage of the convenience, safety, economic, and pollution benefits of open-road (roll-through) tolling. The glaring exception is the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which still uses old-fashioned, stop-and-go barrier gates. This report reviews non-stop tolling practices in the region and recommends that the MTA implement a non-stop tolling demonstration project.

 

2003

A Value-Pricing Toll Plan for the MTA: Saving Drivers Time While Generating Revenue - This report by Charles Komanoff of Komanoff Energy Associates proposes enacting congestion-pricing or "value-pricing" on the MTA's bridges and tunnels by charging a higher toll during peak hours as a means to increase revenue and reduce congestion on or near the MTA crossings.

 

Earlier Reports

Crossroads: Highway Finance Subsidies in New Jersey (April 1995) - This report describes in detail how New Jersey subsidizes driving. In total, government funding of roads in New Jersey totals $3.2 billion annually, but drivers pay only $2.5 billion for those roads. The report also determines the negative externalities caused by driving (which motorists do not compensate the state or the public for).

Citizens' Action Plan (1993) - Tri-State's founding document, this plan outlined the Tri-State Transportation Campaign's initial vision and goals: "We envision a region in which lack of an automobile will limit no one's opportunities, in which city and town centers thrive and open spaces remain intact, in which those who choose to walk or bicycle to their destinations will find safe and pleasant routes, where the air is fit to breathe and businesses and individuals are not taxed daily by congestion and system failure. Our aim is an environmentally sound, economically efficient, and equitable transportation system."